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Using Tension to Fix Large Dents


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#1 Marty

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 08:32 PM


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#2 TimC

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Posted 16 October 2018 - 07:05 AM

Nice repair Marty.  This theory is becoming more and more important as the vehicles get thinner and the inner structure lets them move that easy.  It seems like it takes near nothing when a door gets hit to get this type of compression in today's world.  I guess the trade off is that if you had that door skin on an inner structure of a door from 20 years ago, it would have made the outer skin stretch at the impact point.


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#3 Marty

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Posted 16 October 2018 - 08:20 AM

Ya on that type damage I use a sling type pull plate. I use them on truck doors all the time. Next time I use one I'll make a video of it in use. 


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#4 TimC

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 08:39 AM

Marty, did you build the door rack that your using in the video?


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#5 Marty

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Posted 18 October 2018 - 07:21 AM

Yup. It's a bare bones type that does a bunch of stuff. Just my simplified version of the old hydraulic powered types used on the heavier gauge panels. I do like the ability to use tension in both table mode and upright. Really makes fast work of this type damage.


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#6 spmoylan

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 04:32 AM

As always great video and a lot of good insight Marty. That stand is great. Been looking for a good way to secure a door. Any chance we could get the plans for an instructable? Just the fact that it will hold it vertical and table top is great. 


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#7 Marty

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Posted 20 October 2018 - 09:44 AM

If I get enough requests for plans I may do that. 


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#8 tinknocker

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 10:45 AM

As always great video and a lot of good insight Marty. That stand is great. Been looking for a good way to secure a door. Any chance we could get the plans for an instructable? Just the fact that it will hold it vertical and table top is great. 

 

 

If I get enough requests for plans I may do that. Lo

 

Marty,

 

Great video.

 

I'm also interested in plans for this stand. Love the flip action on it and the ability to stretch. Reminds me of the old door skin stretchers we use to use in the bodyshops back in the day. 



#9 Marty

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Posted 28 October 2018 - 01:21 PM

Yes it's the same principle but this design is simpler. It also stretches in both table and vertical mode which none of the old panel stretchers did.  


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#10 Fosterjeff00

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Posted 23 December 2018 - 12:04 PM

Awesome videos love the info
I am not a pdr tech but all this info is great info
Can you let us know where to get the plates you use for tension pulling
And also the glue you use I would love to try this out
Thanks again 😁👌

#11 Marty

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 10:05 AM

The plates I use are made from items you can find at any Home Depot store. I use T straps and hurricane straps riveted together. Sometimes just the hurricane straps work.


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#12 Dave Roper

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 04:09 PM

God, that reminds me of leading plates to a door to pull the stress so you could work the metal. Hammer, dolly, vixen file. Yep I'm an old fart!

#13 Marty

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 09:33 AM

If you remember solder plates then you ARE an old fart Dave!!   :)

 

Remember panel shapers talking about the Fairmount method? No one even knows what that is any more LOL 


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#14 TimC

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Posted 25 December 2018 - 11:22 AM

Panels that were damaged back then had a lot better chance of being repaired.  Shops don't want to fix panels that could be replaced for similar money but less shop hours.  It's all about the turn around times and profit margins.  Metal working is becoming a lost art in most shops.



#15 Marty

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 11:18 AM

True, but with some of the new high dollar aluminum door panels out there, old school methods are starting to get a second look, at least in some areas of the country like mine.


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#16 JoshG

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Posted 26 December 2018 - 02:23 PM

Marty, do you believe there’s a potential market for offering these repairs to body shops lacking real panel guys?
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#17 Marty

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Posted 27 December 2018 - 09:44 AM

There is especially in aluminum doors. Also quarter panel damage when it can be repaired using tension is a huge tome and money saver. You just have to approach the adjuster (or his supervisor LOL) and the customer correctly when selling it.


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#18 Fosterjeff00

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 06:25 PM

Hi Marty, is there any way you can make a video of tension pulling a quarter panel?
I really like this idea of repairing panels.
The shop I work for would rather repair vs replace.
Sometimes replacing isn’t as cost effective.
The insurance company would rather pay the tech to fix it instead of paying for the panel plus the time to replace it.
Really love all your videos.
Very good info

#19 Marty

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Posted 30 December 2018 - 11:49 AM

Ya I plan on doing a video on that soon.


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#20 ron

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 04:53 PM

you bad to the bone marty.that was great.i've seen you show it on here, and talk about the theory through the years, but the 30 minute video is plain to the point.

great job! "10"


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